Podcast: Aging Beer, Grains, and 2012 Old Stock Ale

A properly aged 2012 Old Stock Ale will be rich, full of toffee aromas and flavors, dark dates and figs, and a subdued alcohol burn. Was that the Scotsman's and Drew's experience?

A properly aged 2012 Old Stock Ale will be rich, full of toffee aromas and flavors, dark dates and figs, and a subdued alcohol burn. Was that the Scotsman’s and Drew’s experience?

A mishmash of topics on today’s show. Drew’s truck breaks down, but on the upside, he picks up some Not Your Father’s Hard Root Beer. (Remember when they tried it at 10 EAST?) They have a 3-year-old Old Stock Ale from North Coast Brewing in Ft. Bragg. This leads into a discussion on aging beers. Why age a beer? How do you age a beer? These questions, plus a listener question are answered on the aging and grains episode of the Ale Evangelist Show.

To download this podcast, right-click the mug, and click "Save Link As" or "Save Target As"

To download this podcast, right-click the mug, and click “Save Link As” or “Save Target As”

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Podcast: Dark Beer

“I just don’t like dark beer…”

In the Dark Beer Show, The Scotsman and Drew enjoy an 825 State Stout from Epic Brewing Company, in Colorado. They discuss the merits of this dark beer and dark beer in general. In this show, they cover the WIDE ranges of flavors and colors contained in the appellation “Dark Beer” as they talk about why you may, in fact, actually LIKE a dark beer if you’d give it a chance. What makes a beer dark? Are dark beers always heavy, highly alcoholic brews?

Listen to the Dark Beer show to find the answers to these, and many more questions, as well as to get a list of beers that are approachable by the inexperienced dark beer drinker.

To download this podcast, right-click the mug, and click "Save Link As" or "Save Target As"

To download this podcast, right-click the mug, and click “Save Link As” or “Save Target As”

Podcast: What is beer?

The name (and the beer) is a mouthful! Dried apricot, sparkling cider...not of one style,  but appropriating aspects of many!

The name (and the beer) is a mouthful! Dried apricot, sparkling cider…not of one style, but appropriating aspects of many!

The Scotsman and Drew discuss the ingredients of beer: Barley, Hops, Water, and Yeast. What are these simple-yet-Oh-So-Complex ingredients and how do brewers use them to make the liquid awesomeness of beer? In this podcast, we answer some questions: Is there really a beer purity law in Germany? What was the Reinheitsgabot instituted for? Are there any other ingredients used in the creation of this most wonderful beverage? In the midst of all of this, they enjoy a Rogue New Crustacean Barleywineish Imperial IPA Sorta. (Yeah, that’s the name. Leave it to Rogue.)

To download this podcast, right-click the mug, and click "Save Link As" or "Save Target As"

To download this podcast, right-click the mug, and click “Save Link As” or “Save Target As”

Pastoral Counseling (Q&A): How do they make beer?

Hello, Congregants.  Welcome to the Pastoral Counseling feature of Ale Evangelism. In this feature, we will attempt to answer the questions asked by friends and readers to bring us all to a better understanding of beer appreciation.

Today’s question is one I have heard for many years.  Most people know about some of the ingredients of beer thanks to marketing of Samuel Adams, Budweiser, and others.  Knowing about hops, barley, and other non-liquid ingredients, it’s easy to understand why this questions gets asked: “How do they make beer?” Hit the jump to find the answer! Continue reading

What do we mean by “crappy beer”?

Hello, Congregants! Today’s article is sure to anger some people, but there’s no way around it. It’s an important part of the Doctrine of Beer, and we need to talk about it.

Collection of beers in different glasses.

Diff'rent strokes, right? Right???

Isn’t any beer better than no beer? Isn’t it all a matter of personal preference? 

Those questions do have merit, despite what many “Beer Snobs” will tell you. The thing is, despite personal preference, there are certain facts that lead us to make the judgment call that there are, in fact, crappy beers. Continue reading