Why do we only want SOME companies to be successful?

Wolf Among Weeds is a stellar IPA, and is currently one of my favorite IPA's out there.

Wolf Among Weeds is a stellar IPA, and is currently one of my favorite IPA’s out there.

As I sit in my new-to-me home, drinking a Wolf Among Weeds by Golden Road Brewing, I ponder why we can’t just make across-the-board changes that help companies succeed.  You see, I had come across this article, and as the fantastic 8% alcohol by volume IPA soothed away the frustrations of a broken sprinkler head which I don’t have time to replace, I pondered why we always have to “help” tiny sections of the economy. The mere existence of these bills mean that we recognize that our system of taxes is burdensome and clearly does the opposite of what this bill is supposed to do. Namely, help companies succeed. Specifically, this sentence is bugging me:

“We wanna make sure that we are creating the environment that makes it easier for these companies to not only start but also to be very successful,” said U.S. Senator Gary Peters.

First off, did Senator Peters just say “wanna?”  I expect people who think they can run this nation to speak using better grammar than that. I admit that perhaps UpNorthLive.com might be transcribing the Senator’s words, but since when is “wanna” a word used by journalists? In either case, it sort of (sorta?) set me off.

The second issue I have is that the existence of the “Craft Beverage Modernization and Tax Reform Act of 2015” shows that lawmakers believe there is a problem with the system. If the CBMaTRA is going to help breweries start and be successful, it stands to reason that it’s currently difficult for businesses to start and be successful. If that is the case, why not just create the MaTRA, and give ALL businesses the benefit of starting and being successful?

However, as the volume of beer in my glass dwindles, I realize that my railing against this issue isn’t going to do much to help Michiganders (Michiganians?) figure out that the problem with this bill is that it doesn’t go far enough. Why stop at one industry?

I know, I know…the tax system in place for Craft Breweries is weird and complex.  At least in Michigan.  According to one brewer:

“Right now the taxation system is so complex it’s based off carbonation level what type of fruit is in the product the alcohol level of the product and there’s a big flow chart on figuring out what tax you owe and no one really understands it,” said Scott Newman-Bale, President of Business Development with Short’s Brewing Company.

Punctuation aside, that has got to be incredibly frustrating. However, I’d venture to say that Craft Beer isn’t the only industry burdened with such stupid tax laws. Why not spend the time and effort to just fix them all? But hey, I just drained the last of my 8% ABV IPA, and am considering reaching for another…what do *I* know?

Show News: Ale Evangelist Show going on hiatus for a few weeks. WE WILL RETURN!

Cheers, my friends!

Cheers, my friends!

Good morning, good afternoon, and good evening, ladies and gents. The Scotsman here to share some news about the show.  First off, I want to take the time right now to thank each and every one of you for your support, your interaction, and for listening to the Ale Evangelist Show. You’ve exceeded our expectations as to how many people would be interested in a show like ours, and we very much appreciate every download, every share, and every one of you for your time.

In some personal news, the Scotsfamily is selling their house and moving to a larger house. It’s a stressful process, made more stressful by other factors requiring that we close escrow sooner than normal.  This results in us having to pack up our lives in about 3 weeks, and then move in about 2 days. It’s a short distance to move, and we definitely need more room.

In some more personal news, Mrs. The Scotsman is pregnant, and the Scotsfamily is expecting a new baby in late January of next year.  We’re very excited.

All of this life change is exciting, but the house move is really close to the time I will be travelling to Boston for work, and it’s all conspiring to eat my free time.  The net result of it all is that we are having to put the show on a hiatus for a few weeks, until we can make some serious progress on packing things up. I’m envisioning at least 2 weeks, maybe 3.

I may not know all your names, but I hope to see and hear from you all again when we return!

I may not know all your names, but I hope to see and hear from you all again when we return!

I will, however, keep you all up to date with posts here and on the Facebook Fan Page.  And I’m hoping to record some short segments just to keep you all on your toes, possibly commenting on news stories or letting you know about some fantastic new beers I’ve had. We apologize for the hiatus, but it’s one of those unavoidable things in life. Please know that I’m still available for texting at 209-800-ALES, and I’m really stoked to be able to record new podcasts from the new place!

So until then, this is Drew and the Scotsman wishing you all some happy drinking, and stay tuned! Cheers!

Soli Deo Gloria!

Podcast: Aging Beer, Grains, and 2012 Old Stock Ale

A properly aged 2012 Old Stock Ale will be rich, full of toffee aromas and flavors, dark dates and figs, and a subdued alcohol burn. Was that the Scotsman's and Drew's experience?

A properly aged 2012 Old Stock Ale will be rich, full of toffee aromas and flavors, dark dates and figs, and a subdued alcohol burn. Was that the Scotsman’s and Drew’s experience?

A mishmash of topics on today’s show. Drew’s truck breaks down, but on the upside, he picks up some Not Your Father’s Hard Root Beer. (Remember when they tried it at 10 EAST?) They have a 3-year-old Old Stock Ale from North Coast Brewing in Ft. Bragg. This leads into a discussion on aging beers. Why age a beer? How do you age a beer? These questions, plus a listener question are answered on the aging and grains episode of the Ale Evangelist Show.

To download this podcast, right-click the mug, and click "Save Link As" or "Save Target As"

To download this podcast, right-click the mug, and click “Save Link As” or “Save Target As”

Podcast: Interview with Aaron Wharton of Cambria Beer Co.

Come to beautiful Cambria, California, and bring your thirst for some Cambria Beer Co. brews!

Come to beautiful Cambria, California, and bring your thirst for some Cambria Beer Co. brews!

The Scotsman goes solo and heads for the coast…the Central Coast of California, that is. The ScotsFamily heads to picturesque Cambria, California to share some pints with and interview Aaron Wharton, brewer and owner of the soon-to-be-named-something-else Cambria Beer Company. Why the name change? Well, hear Aaron talk about why, how he came to start a brewery in Cambria from his hometown of Modesto, and listen to Scotsman and Aaron talk about his brews on the Ale Evangelist Show.

This surprisingly spacious taproom is where wonderfulness is served!

This surprisingly spacious taproom is where wonderfulness is served!

The proprietor doing his thing!

The proprietor doing his thing!

The beautiful interior of this fine taproom shows a love of the business that the owners lavish upon it.

The beautiful interior of this fine taproom shows a love of the business that the owners lavish upon it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To download this podcast, right-click the mug, and click "Save Link As" or "Save Target As"

To download this podcast, right-click the mug, and click “Save Link As” or “Save Target As”